Why Fashion Revolution is a failed attempt to fight Fast Fashion

Let’s be honest. We. All. Agree. That fast fashion is unethical. And. We. All. Know. That fast fashion is bad. It’s made by children, in unsafe conditions, with polluting materials. And it’s cheap. And seriously, no one looks good in Primark outfits.

But while H&M and the misguided MIA successfully pirated Fashion Revolution’s Week with their own initiative based on the Recycling idea, we can’t help but point out that our green fashion friends are also misguided in their online outraged rants.

Of course H&M’s initiative is greenwashing. Of course it is commercial. But that’s the point. They are relevant because they are still doing business while addressing ethical topics.

On the other hand, Fashion Revolution’s community opposes : Questions. As if questions will change the game.

Sorry, but no. Business will change the game. The only way for the fashion industry to evolve is to improve business operations while including ethical and responsible decisions.

Many young ethical brands fail, because their brand is focusing too much on activism, marketing their fashion through its ethical quality only, while what sells for a fashion brand (however ethical it is) is design and trend relevance. And business efficiency.

If your brand uses great materials, names itself “green something”, and keeps tweeting about Fashion Revolution, but has not invested in : creative direction, production management and sales development. Then you will fail. And there will be no impact in complaining about H&M’s marketing games.

Ethical Fashion now needs investors. As an industry. Not ambassadors. It is not a cause anymore. If it remains one, it will be lost.

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