Page 1
tumblr_n97t164NpA1qgvybqo1_1280
Video

How to Learn French with Camille Rowe: the reason why fashion should still love France

Share the love

Camille Rowe Pourcheresse was our hit-IT-heat-HIP girl in 2012 when our “friends” from fashion magazines were describing her body as “untypical” …Fashion history proved we were right as we now see everywhere a celebration of the diversity of women bodies. Anorexic shooting are now the realy “untypical”.

France as a brand is trying hard to redefine itself. We don’t have the American Dream, our myths and stories are moral, political. Not made for business per se.

Our know-how, our French Touch might be recognized worldwide, but who can really support this vision today? Most of the time, France is associated to a sort of Lost Paradise: Coco Chanel, Marie-Antoinette, Brigitte Bardot, even Carine Roitfeld…aren’t they from the past? Can they really root France in a contemporaneity?

That’s probably what Camille Rowe achieved in her French lesson: playing with clichés about the Frenchie (yes, in London, most of the guys think that our ladies are bipolar!), and suggesting a new interpretation…

A reconciliation of a sweet arrogance with an ultra-feminine power. A woman one might only desire, therefore respect.

As we like to be right, we believe far more in the Made in French instead of focusing on Made in France. France is a spirit before being a body. Camille Rowe proves once again that our French singularity is in this mix between a very physical attractiveness which empowers a captivating personality.

We love this sparkling Parisian woman: she’s evasive and so free. The best way to communicate about a French brand these days is not to tag it or qualify through the fact the brand is actually French. We need to leave the brand express its creativity. The most intriguing, disturbing, bizarre designers are the real French. A French brand should try to love complicated attitudes; French brands should maybe dive in absurdity. French brands should trouble its customers. That’s probably the only difference now of what French brands can bring on the table against every pop brand machine with a too clever, too simple speech. A French brand should be desired, should be tough to get.

Oh and Made in French don’t care about borders and territories: Camille is an American icon and / or French. Do we care?

Vive la République

 

more
image1
Standard

Shopping Trends for Spring with Jules B: Go All Yoncé

Share the love

We can’t say we have not been swept away by Queen Bey’s latest releases. From Drunk in Love through Yoncé to the Partition video, we have been in awe of the feminine statement she puts out there. And it inspired us this quite strong hip hop inspired look shopped at Jules B, a cool store carrying some of the most trendy contemporary brands. Bear with us and get sophisticatedly nasty.

Start with this rare pick and the best deal we’ve seen so far this week. A Carven jacquard dress, with a slight animalistic trait (leopard inspired). The oversize bow hanging above cleavage is the killer detail.

 jacquard-carven-dress-676780-230727_medium

Make it city-wise, tame the beast with a very sharp sports jacket by Helmut Lang. When Kanye styles up Kim, she looks better, now trust us. We’re Kimyeing you up if you feel up to it. This jacket is safe but singular: gloss is the new bling.

helmut-lang-gloss-knit-baseball-jacket-766778-1516098_image

Touch it up with your street cred insurance: an Alexander Wang white IT-Bag. Pebbles on the bottom, start there and now you’re here (says Drake).

alexander-wang-soft-pebbled-rocco-bowling-bag-771150-1518866_image

Now the shoes and the street is yours. But hear this. Our wags love when we shop for them, but we have failed with shoe choices on a couple occasions lately so this is it. We’re a bit shy on it for a while. But you can shop great styles like this one. To go Yoncé or not. Love yo!

Post written in collaboration with Jules B.

more
repertoire fashion
Standard

Shopping trends for Spring with REPERTOIRE: undergrounge and Steve McQueen

Share the love

So the fashion weeks are about to be over. As it’s always good to envision what’s going to happen at the end of the year, it’s even better to be able to shop what is now available.

Here’s a shopping bag we’ve conceived with Repertoire, a cool independent retailer who opened its first stores over 15 years ago in Southern England.

Barbour is on track with few pieces, that are tributes to Steve McQueen; he entered The Greenhorn Enduro, a rigorous 500-mile motorcycle race across California’s challenging mountains and blisteringly hot Mojave desert, in 1963. The new new man (read GQ brilliant debate) is in need of icons; deeper characters seem to be the new hype. And we’re happy with that

Patrizia Pepe is a an Italian brand founded in 1993. You don’t necessarily find it easily in the UK whereas the positioning and materials are great. With their new “Undergrounge” project, we bet that you’re  going to pay attention to this chic brand.

We like this scarf that you can find on Repertoire. A great accessory which will add a tremendous effect to your favorite knitwear.

Post written in collaboration with Repertoire.

more
miu miu women's club
Standard

Eye Surgery Versus Contact Lenses – What Is The Best Long-Term Option?

Share the love

Anyone fed up with wearing glasses day-in, day-out, or changing their contacts on a daily basis has probably considered eye surgery. Laser eye surgery isn’t suitable for everyone though, and the only other option is continuous-wear contacts, which can be worn for up to 30 days.

With both eye surgery and contact lenses offering good vision without the hassle, which is the best long term option?

Quality of vision

It has been proven that eye surgery and extended use contacts offer good or excellent vision for the right person. However, with your own vision changing over time, it’s worth considering which is best in the long run.

Laser eye surgery has advanced in recent years, with most patients benefitting from 20/20 vision. There will be a handful of people that find they have to wear reading glasses occasionally in the future, but this is often an unavoidable aspect of old-age.

As contact lenses are only worn for 30 days, it’s very easy to change the prescription in the event of your vision changing. However, it’s likely that you will still have to wear glasses to read.

Safety

Contact lenses and eye surgery are both very safe for most people, but there are some risks to consider with both. First up, laser eye surgery can cause dry eyes or glare, but continuous wear contact lenses carry a risk of eye infection.

A few years ago, one of the world’s top eye doctors claimed that contact lenses were more likely to lead to a loss of vision over time than laser eye surgery.

Cost

The cost of laser eye surgery does vary depending on the clinic, the type of procedure and so on, but in general, you can expect to pay between £1,000 and £1,800 per eye.

Although it may initially seem costly, when compared to the long-term cost of continuous wear contact lenses, it more affordable. One set of 30-day contacts is around £40 so £480 a year or £4,800 over a decade.

When choosing between the two, you’ll have to ask yourself a number of questions, such as whether you need the flexibility of surgery, which carries the highest risk for you and whether you are willing to pay more in the long run, rather than a larger fee upfront. Don’t forget there are often payment plans available to make laser eye surgery more affordable.

Before making any sudden decisions, it is important that you find out more about laser eye surgery and continuous contact lenses. There are pros and cons to both, so it’s worth discussing your needs with a specialist.

 

more
coeur preppy 2
Standard

Peter Jeun Ho Tsang (coeur): “be experimental with your style “

Share the love

We met Peter Jeun Ho Tsang during a pop up event in Shoreditch. His deep understanding and curiosity for all things fashion and ethos is very pleasant. We had a chance to catch up to ask him few questions about his fascinating brand (and not only because it’s a French name), coeur.

Hi Peter! You mention that the coeur signature silk is woven at one of England’s finest and oldest fabric mills dating back to the 18th century. How did you spot this factory?

This was the starting point for coeur and how the entire brand developed. It was through a design collaborative project that I was undertaking with a fellow menswear designer that I found this factory in Sudbury, Suffolk which has been around since the 18th century. I instantly fell in love with the craft of silk weaving and it’s just developed from there. We are actually launching a film early next year showcasing the factory and coeur products being hand made in England.

coeur preppy

A lot of rising stars (I think about Oliver Proudlock from Made in Chelsea) wears your pieces: what’s the story you tell them?

I always tell them the ethos of brand. We are currently seeing the menswear grow, as well becoming a lot more diverse. coeur is the lifestyle brand for the modern dandy – the reemergence of the gentleman that really cares about the way he dresses and takes care of himself. This always resonates with the celebrities that wear my clothing … as my designs somewhat show off their flair and flamboyant side. One of the pieces that Olympic Gymnast Louis Smith wore actually featured in a press piece entitled ‘The Power Blazer’ which I thought was really befitting for the coeur style and philosophy.

There’s a pink desert in your last lookbook scenery: where was it shot?

That was shot out in Dubai, that was then dusted with magic to turn the sand pink. Shot by a great photography studio – the results show off coeur’s colorful side.

Menswear is becoming more and more sophisticated; what would you recommend to a man who wants to discover fashion? What should be the very first step?

I would say be experimental with your style and not to be afraid of colour or mixing different textures and garment styles together. For me, it’s about the tiny details and the way a gentleman puts those finishing touches to his outfit such as a pocket square, or the way he grooms his hair – or moustache since it is Movember.

What can we wish you?

If you could grant me a wish, then I would spread the knowledge of gentlemanly dressing to all the men in world.

more
take courage
Standard

Is fashion a victim of media?

Share the love

That’s a question we ask ourselves every two weeks: what if the media model of fashion was actually destroying fashion?

In fashion, journalists don’t publicly criticize institutions

Whereas for films, literature, theater or music, critics are very intense and deeply argue on the value of a creation, we very rarely read that a collection is bad or pointless. Who (except Cathy Horyn, an American woman, not an European one…) did criticize Heidi Slimane during the last seasons? Which major is going to explain to the whole world why Terry Richardson is just a joke, a marketing gimmick? Fashion sometimes wants to become an art majeur. And there are reasons for that: Chalayan, undiscovered talents in Asia, there are people who are real artists. But because fashion media seem to be stuck with Saint Wintour and Athena Roitfeld, fashion cannot become Art. The genius of art can only appear when strong oppositions rise. Zola had his Dreyfus; Damien Hirst generates strong debates. We should have this crystallization of passion and ideas. But it’s not the case, because fash’ world is in a vicious circle.

In fashion, brands and stakeholders do not hesitate to pick up the phone to make us shut up

In France, where we write on a popular blog, some brands called us because they were not happy with some of our posts. Our inbox is frequently filled with insults and threats. If fashion brands are not ok with a negative share of voice, they just stop the media buy pipeline. In fashion, there are very few counter powers. There’s a famous word in France which says that we arrange fashion weeks for less than 1,500 people. It’s not wrong. And this concentration of attention is not very safe, a fortiori for brands themselves. If you don’t want to solve the reasons why bloggers or journalists are not happy with a specific product or collection, you can reduce the digital footprints we are going to generate. But you won’t be able to do the same with your customers. If you want to sell premium, you need to be premium in all the layers of your relationships.

In fashion, there’s now internet…

The reduction of time and the explosion of borders between bloggers and journalists are big news for brands. It’s a big opportunity to set up a revolution in the way influencers, consumers and brands work together. But it’s also a very conservative battlefield. Suzy Menkes’ Circus of Fashion spotted all these bizarre wannabe wandering around catwalks, while fashion journalists set up a confusion between promotional activities and professional abnegation. That’s a shame that we bloggers copy the bad habits of these “professionals”. We must keep our right to say when we don’t like a piece or an attitude. Otherwise, our detractors will be right forever. We will only remain a bunch of superficial, excessive, meaningless people.

In fashion, retailers are far beyond media

While media maintain a stupid distance with their readers, hesitating between an aspiration for luxury and an exclusiveness which only satisfies 2 PR agencies, retailers have understood for a long time that they need to make their customers the true heroes. If customers buy, it means that they validate the idea. If they don’t buy, the idea is not validated. In this new check & balance fashion system, retailers accept criticisms. If it doesn’t work, let’s try again. But how many fashion and luxury brands are really ready to resist and manage online consumers, who declare that they’re not happy with a product? Look at electronics: it’s not one but millions of consumers who go on forum and set up the new rules of consumption? In fashion, it’s like if the word “No” does not exist. We adore, we love, we can’t wait for the next collection of Mister BS, even if we’ll never buy THAT. But it seems like saying no, thank you, is not an acceptable cultural habit.

Jimmy Kimmel, who’s not a newbie, plays with that. If you attack fashion, it’s easy, no one will pay attention. But if you attack a cross-practices creative icon like Kanye West, you need to be ready to argue, ripost, well set up a real conversation. As usual, for the microcosm, a debate between Kimmel (3 million followers on Twitter) and West (10 million followers on Twitter) is not worth to write an article in the fashion columns.

How could they get their backstage access otherwise?

more
Korin Avraham fashion blogger israel
Standard

May Cover Girl: Korin Avraham

Share the love

We had a chance to finally meet Korin Avraham in London, on a sunny morning. Energetic, determined, Korin is one of the very first Israeli bloggers to reach a certain notoriety abroad. In her bag, she brought so many amazing outfits: prints, local designers, vintage, but also Dr Martens (the crazy pink shoes on the photo below). She’s our cover girl of the month.

 You’re one of the very first Israeli fashion bloggers to export your style abroad: how would you define it?

I live by one simple rule when it comes to fashion: never take yourself too seriously! My wardrobe contains all kind of outfits, vintage, classic, simple and elegant, bright colors, crazy prints and lots of accessories.
I never plan what to wear, I wake up in the morning in a certain mood and try to find an outfit to express my feelings.
Just as I don’t have boundaries with my style, I found myself develop a desire to enrich people who love fashion wherever they may be, and so that’s why I started to post in English, and built up a community from various corners of the world. I also lived in NYC for a while and worked in the fashion industry and was known as the ‘Israeli fashionista’ there.

You used to be a lawyer: how did you decide to dedicate yourself to fashion blogging?

I still work part time as a lawyer (and always dress up when i go to court). However blogging is not work for me as I love doing it and it feels so neutral.

What are your favorite brands?

My favorite designers are Moschino and Chanel but I love pieces which are made with love and creativity even if its not a known brand.

Israeli brands we should discover?

Inbal Dror for wedding dresses, Alon Livne, Yosef, Tamar Primak, Tami Bar Lev, Dorit Bar Or.

more
Reut Shechter
Standard

Reut Shechter from “Working Nine to Five”, on hard core & light elegant clothing

Share the love

Reut Shechter runs a very interesting blog from Israel, called “working nine to five”. Dedicated to women with average closets, Reut knows how to sublime daily outfits…

When and why did you start blogging?

I launched my blog at the end of March 2013 after a year of “contemplation”. I started my blog because I wanted to share my passion for fashion. I want to share my outfits and help other women, like me, who are looking for inspiration.

“Fashion can change the world”: what do you think about that?

I think it’s true. After all we don’t go around naked? (well at least not most of the time :)). Most of us are influenced in one way or another by the fashion industry and by the fact that we wear clothes that symbolize us in many ways to others.

Can you define an “Israeli” fashion identity?

Israeli fashion is very modern and chic but because we have warm weather most of the year, our clothes should be appropriate for that. We don’t have a strong winter like in Europe so I will say that our warm clothes are different and not necessarily like in other countries. Also, I think that not many people wear elegant clothing here, in contrast to Europe and other countries. I think it’s because of the weather. It’s hard to be in a suit when it’s almost 40 degrees Celsius outside.

© photography: Liron Weissman, Hair & Makeup: Shay Erez

 

What is elegance?

Elegance for me is my favorite style. It’s a style that leaves a strong impression. Style that screams sophisticated and glamor although I think that like in anything in life there is a limit, so you can wear “hard core” elegant clothing (such as a suit) or “light elegant” clothing (such as jeans, blouse and a blazer).

What can we wish you?

That my blog will be an inspiration for women all over the world to find their inner-chic.

more
Lucy Seremak
Standard

5 minutes with Lucy Seremak, Polish blogger and fond of the Golden Age of Hollywood

Share the love

Today, our world tour drives us to Poland, where we meet Lucy Seremak from Insider Online. As Warsaw is progressively attracting a lot of new talents, we wanted to get a “local” point of view.

When and why did you start blogging?

I was always fascinated by new media, fashion and magazines and I thought it would be great to be a part of it. So about a year ago I started my blog.

“Fashion can change the world”: what do you think about that?

I don’t know if fashion is changing the world but for sure it influences it a lot. Now fashion is not only about clothes, it is architecture, music, food, tech, vehicles. It is in almost every aspect of our lives. Even in politics, just look at Michelle Obama and her relationship with fashion. For the second time, she’s Vogue’s cover girl, and that means something. But (to quote Stan Lee) “with great power there must also come great responsibility“. On one hand fashion icons, brands, models are involved in great amount of charity but on the other, fashion industry is partially responsible for creating unattainable, unhealthy models of beauty. Do I think slim models like Anja Rubik look beautiful? Of course I do, but I believe that beauty doesn’t know size. This is one of the things I want to show on my blog, you can wear size 12 or 16 and still look pretty and fashionable. I’m not size zero but I’ve learned how to dress properly to my figure.

Can you define a fashion identity in Poland?

For sure we like to keep up with the trends. Even though 30 or 40 years ago we only had like 3 brands available on the market, everyone was sewing and tailoring at home. Now we have big retailers, luxury brands and online shops from around the world. Not to mention a lot of great Polish designers like Bohoboco, Zuo Corp, Nenukko, Lukasz Jemiol. With all that everyone can create their own unique style.

What are your sources of inspirations?

Generally I’m inspired by the Golden Age of Hollywood and contemporary New York but really I take my inspiration from everything. It can be movie, piece of furniture, song, my friends and my favorite blogs ManRepeller, Hanneli and Cocorosa. And of course magazines, as I said before, I’m fascinated by magazines, not just the photos or layout but the whole experience of keeping it in hand, flipping pages, smell, the process of creating it… Probably I’ll be the last person on earth that will be still buying paper magazines instead of downloading them.

What can we wish you?

Just an Upper East Side apartment. I’m kidding. I wish that my blog grows enough that I could attend New York Fashion Week.

more
Afaf and Marwa blog
Standard

Afaf & Marwa: from Morocco with fashion love

Share the love
Afaf & Marwa are two sisters, living in Morocco. They started blogging 2 years ago, and their style is fresh, simple and enthusiastic. We definitely wanted to get their energy.
When and why did you start blogging?
We started blogging two years ago ! At the very beginning, it was just for fun, but it became more serious. But the main reason has always been to share our passion with readers from all over the world, and to contribute in the development of Fashion in our country, Morocco. It’s like showing Moroccans that fashion doesn’t have any limit, any border..
How would you define the “Moroccan style” as a fashion blogger?
With globalization, Moroccan style is very close to the European and American one. We have international brands, we read international fashion magazines, so our sources of inspiration are quite the same. However, Moroccans are a bit conservative. We consume fashion, taking into account our traditions and habits.Thus, Moroccan style is a sort of Occidental Fashion adapted to life in Morocco.
What do you expect from brands?
What do we expect from brands.. Trust and also Respect. Some brands consider fashion bloggers as a bunch of people who waste their time posting photos of them.. While it’s not ! Fashion bloggers do a great work, and brands should stop thinking that these blogs are a platform for free ads.
“Pochette Cartable” Afaf & Marwa Créations
“Fashion can change the world”: what do you think about that?
Fashion can really change the world ! But there are some other things that can lead a better change.

We think that fashion can’t do it alone.
What can we wish you?
Long life to Afaf & Marwa, more and more visits from all over the world, success, beautiful things, and the list can’t end ! We hope that you will enjoy our content you, don’t hesitate to tell us what you think ! It’s very helpful !
more