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Instagram account to follow: @haavseen – by Vincent Laserson

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Menswear specialist and curator of all good things Vincent Laserson, previously member of the now split-up crew De Jeunes Gens Modernes (all seem to have found greater callings within the creative industries), documents his findings on this inspiring account. Things you think you’ve seen, actually he haasssen. Americans are intrigued by the whimsical concept of La Parisienne. This guy is some great exemple of Le Parisien.

A photo posted by Vincent Laserson (@haavseen) on

 

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APONIE: when a mother and her children decide to create fragrances loaded with meanings and love

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A new French brand has just revealed a collection of four new fragrances. APONIE created by Jocelyne Duval, explores new notes for men or for women, which are echoes from one another through seasons, moods and attitude.

We had a chance to interview her son, Marc-Aurèle Jules.

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Aponie is all about hyphenated identities and worldwide inspirations. How did you create fragrances right in this crossroad?

Interbreeding is a chance and a richness, it defines us and we care about it. My mother already grew up between Western and African educations, then in the same way, she raised us in this multiculturality, which opened our minds to cultures and traditions from here and there.

The best example of our love for interbreeding remains the name of our perfume “Mulâtresse” because a Mulâtresse, in French, is a daughter born of the union of black and white parents (it was also the nickname given to Jeanne Duval, the muse of the French poet Charles Baudelaire). Our origins from Europe and Arica, and our discoveries of regions in Asia or America brought us other exotic and cosmopolitan inspirations.

Personally, I have been brought up among perfumes. My mother used to soak, very young, our pillows with the Eau de Cologne by Mr Thibeault, then sprayed the filter of the vacuum cleaner in order to fill the house with the Eau de Parfum Panthère by Cartier, and our walks never missed to stop by a perfumery during the weekend or a manufacture as soon as we were travelling. Obviously, when she decided to make her dream come true by creating APONIE, recent graduate of HEC Paris, I chose with no hesitation to to join her into partnership, and so did my sister!

There is a lot of love and humour in your four new fragrances. A collection as a whole, which is very different from other “blockbusters” like Chanel, focusing on “hero” products like N°5….

Indeed, there is a lot of LOVE in our fragrances, the love of perfume firstly, and above all the love of self which is one of the main values of our House. APONIE extols three values that are the love of self, the teaching of happiness and the sublimation of self, which passes by perfume.

In addition to our philosophy of love and happiness, we put a lot of poetry into our fragrances. We realized bold and previously unseen mixes to reach perfumes “that sing the ecstasy of the soul and senses” as Baudelaire said.

We meant to create essences starting from personalities and characters. In this sense, I think our collection must be understood as a whole set but according to his sensitivity, each and everyone will find its own product-hero.

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The collection is genderless: how did you operate this fusion?

As I said earlier, our starting point for the creation of each perfume was the personality. Our perfumes carry a non-verbal communication that delivers instantly the message of your personality. The family of our first collection is made up of the proud and fiery woman (Mulâtresse), the elegant and distinguished man (Aryballe), the sparkling and serene woman (Jolanta), and the happy and free man (Sybaris).

Our collection was aiming at two fragrances for men and two for women. Once finished, to our greatest surprise, our perfumes Sybaris and Aryballe, initially designed for men, turned out to be unisex, because they happened to be amazingly worn by women. The perfumes still haven’t given all their secrets to the fusion of genders!aponie mulatresse parfum

Should perfume do a bit of politics? :) 

 

:D
The House of APONIE features the richness of interbreeding, the mix of cultures, and the teaching of happiness. If these values talks to you, then we’ll think about it in 2017 using as a programme the Perfumes as a model of unity.

You work with the craftsmen of Grasse ; is it something important to work with the French excellence stakeholders?

This French touch appeared as obvious, with the creation in Grasse, the cradle of perfumes, the manufacture in the Cosmetic Valley, expertise and competitiveness pole, and of course the elegance, the charm and et the character of Paris.

Perfumes and cosmetics are among the best ambassadors of France worldwide. We are proud to be French.

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What’s so great about Instagram? An interview with Kristen Joy Watts, Community Team, Art and Fashion Lead at Instagram

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Fashion Weeks used to be a closed network, with buyers and happy journalists. It Girls were fighting for the FROW. But with Social Media and more specifically Instagram, there’s a brand new playground in which new public and new communities gather. It’s not the Front Row that matters anymore, but the backstage, the making-of, the secret stories propagated and shaped by makers. An ongoing and perpetual reinvention of fashion, which goes beyond conventions and traditional rules. Instagram is our favourite social network (you can follow Vu Quan & lilzeon and his new project). It’s a goldmine to wander around others’ dreams and through people ideas.

Instagram, it’s the reality and the perception of this reality.

We had a chance to chitchat with Kristen Joy Watts, Community Team, Art and Fashion Lead at Instagram to share few ideas, crushes, vision about the network.

Let’s go, in, sta, gram.

Instagram has become one of the ‘places to be’ for fashion brands as well as for fashion enthusiasts. Is there a risk of creating a ‘snacking culture’ for brands that are more luxury oriented?

There is a lot of fashion storytelling on Instagram that is light and fun and fast. We also see really sophisticated, unforgettable storytelling from the fashion community, whether Landon Nordeman’s (@landonnordeman) Instagram-first fashion week coverage for The Cut:

#theCutPFW @rickowensonline Rehearsal #pfw for @thecut #eiffeltower #jaimeparis

A photo posted by Landon Nordeman (@landonnordeman) on

…or Richie Talboy (@okrichie) and Lucas Lefler’s (@lucas_lefler) #emptyrunway series for Vanity Fair. In France too there is a growing community of inspiring creatives on Instagram, from Carin Olsson (@parisinfourmonths) to Tiffany Cooper (@tiffanycooper_) to Simon Portes Jacquemus (@jacquemus). Fashion houses, publications and individuals all over the world look to them for inspiration.

"GRIS" #JACQUEMUS FIRST PRE/COLLECTION / @harleyweir @jamesvaleri @aninevanvelzen

A photo posted by SIMON PORTE JACQUEMUS (@jacquemus) on


We are noticing some emerging trends in the network à la Tumblr (such as pro-ANA movements that are creating support groups) and that you have started to recruit people in order to identify and share the community with the world. How do you identify creative community members ? Do you have dedicated tools and contacts with them?

The Community Team at Instagram was created to discover and elevate the most amazing people and storytelling on Instagram. Our small but mighty team has members in Tokyo, London, Moscow, São Paulo, San Francisco and, of course, New York, where I am based. We celebrate the community on Instagram from North Korea to Nebraska. My discovery process involves everything from research on Instagram to asking everyone I meet if there’s anyone they’ve discovered who I need to know about. I always find amazing people when I’m in Paris.

Success is hard to achieve and gaining numerous followers is a lot of work on Instagram. However, some companies such as Instabrand are created with a view to manage Instagram’s talents. What advice would you give to a talent that is starting on Instagram and wants to join the tribe of very followed accounts?

For us, Instagram is all about the fun of sharing your story and discovering amazing people to follow. Here are a few best practices for someone who’s just starting out. First, tell a consistent story. Second, follow some people you know, some people you don’t know and some people you just discovered (for example, I follow many people in fashion and art but I also follow a florist in Moscow and a lifestyle photographer who captures wonderful images of his two Newfoundland dogs. Finally, connect with other people. This can be through likes and comments or even through meeting in person for coffee or an InstaMeet. The InstaMeet phenomenon, whereby Instagrammers meet in a location to take pictures of scenes which inspire them, allows the community to come together and share their passions and creative processes in new, real relationships with others.

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A Selective Attention Test With The Free Help Guy

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Before reading the interview, do this test. Do it. Seriously.

How did you get on? Did you get it right?

This illustration of our selective attention (originally developed by Daniel Simons and Christopher Chabris) represents an interesting psychology and an almost unnerving duping of the brain.

In this video, The Free Help Guy created a version a bit bolder, a bit deeper. And it’s true: busy we are, busy we claim to be. Whereas very important people and topics are around us, we might lose ourselves in the daily bread.

We had the chance to interview T., the man behind The Free Help Guy, a very interesting platform, connecting free helpers. In a world where we don’t talk much to our neighbours, there might be a need to re-shape social links…

Many experts talk about the fact that attention economy is the new playground for humans; time should be more valuable than money itself. Do you think that basic reactions like empathy, trust, caring, are dismantled by the noise which tries to grab our mind?

I think you’re right. Attention economics looks at our attention as a scarce resource which is exactly what it is, increasingly so, in modern society. As with anything scarce, its value is increasing but I fear we’re most likely to spend this attention on short term gain and instant gratification, whether it be box sets or booze. Empathy, trust development and the act of caring for one another is not a short term game and it’s rarely instantly gratifying, so they’re demoted down our attentive ‘to do’ lists. The aim of our film is to challenge this. To suggest to the viewer that our attention selection can be duped and that there’s often a cost to this – in our case the cost of ignoring the issue of suicide in the UK.

Suicide is a social issue; it’s not that easy to properly identify when someone’s about to commit it. What should we do in order to help, or at least be more vigilant?

Each case of suicide is as individual and unique as one person is from another. But as a foundation to it all, we have to be more aware of the problem and consequently much more open, accepting and pragmatic about its many influencing factors. I think this starts with the everyday person. I’ve heard too many people say whilst shrugging their shoulders that it’s an ‘irrational act’, yet I’ve heard from people who have described the most detailed, measured and rational means by which loved ones have taken their lives. Assuming it’s irrational is a way for that person to shirk their potential to empathize and understand and without this there’s no openness, accepting or pragmatism. If society as a whole started paying attention then there’d be a greater likelihood of people considering committing suicide coming forward and seeking help before they do.

This initiative is part of a more global goal for the Free Help Guy: could you describe your purpose?

I have a hunch that traditional social enterprise and charity work the wrong way round. Organisations develop solutions and then find beneficiaries for them. They but be right and it’s certainly a more obviously scalable approach but the cost is that each issue is dehumanized. I want to explore the alternative, which is taking one person and their problem (or request for help) and creating something that works for them but hopefully helps more in the process at the very least through informing and inspiring a wider audience through documenting each instance of helping. Whether you’re me, a collaborator or simply just a reader of my blog, there’s a real person with a real problem to engage you with each issue and I think this is powerful. Either way, my goal is to do all I can for those who approach me needing help whilst mobilising others to do good in the process – and doing this anonymously!

What can we wish you?

Collaboration. This is what I wish! Individuals, agencies, charities, whoever you are, if you believe in doing good differently then I’d love to hear from you.

To know more how you can help, go visit the dedicated page.

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An inteview with JUDY WU: “Creating a collection is like a trip into the unknown”

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If you haven’t heard yet about JUDY WU, mind the gap.

Raised in Shanghai, before graduating from Central Saint Martins, the rising talent then developed her techniques for House of Holland among other great Maisons. She’s part of this new “Born in China” / “New Made in China” trend (like SIMONGAO) that you’d better watch carefully as this bunch of creators is changing the fashion rules. An arty interpretation of a strong womanhood we adore.

Let’s chit-chat with JUDY WU.

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There are new designers coming from China, who are definitely changing the game in fashion: do you consider yourself as part of this movement?

It is great to see quite a few Chinese faces at LFW this season. I am always proud of my cultural background which provides me a great source of inspiration and strength, although the brand JUDY WU has always being based in London. Chinese designers are definitely gaining more and more exposure on the international stage. There are many very talented Chinese designers who are working extremely hard to make their voice heard and I am glad to be able to contribute to it.

 

London seems to be the perfect place for rising talents to launch their collections: what’s the secret weapon of London?

London is a very international and multi-cultural city which provides many platforms for talents regardless where you are from. The creative industry here allows young talents to fully express their creativity. The industry and media here are always looking for new ideas instead of only driving the big names. There are also some great art and design schools such as Central Saint Martins, Royal College of Arts, London College of Fashion… etc. Those schools bring up young talents at a very high standard for the creative industry all over the world. London is a magical place!

 

Your collection is both a mix of traditional tailoring, with a twist of fantasy, and in the meantime it’s very wearable by women on a daily basis: how do you manage this tricky balance between style and “ready-to-wear”?

My aim is to create a lifestyle wardrobe for a modern independent woman who also has a free spirit. Having the image of my muse in mind, keep adding or deleting to each of her looks until they reach a balance.

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Where do you find your inspirations?

There are a lot of things that are inspiring to me such as art, music, nature, movies…etc. There is always something new to learn about this world which sometimes makes me feel rather ignorant. Creating a collection is like a trip into the unknown. Learning is the fun part of the journey.

 

Fashion can change the world: do you agree?

Designers are quite sensitive to the world that is around them. They express their thoughts through their work and hope to change the world to if not better then to a prettier place.

 

What are the next steps of your story as a designer?

Focusing on my next collection and telling my story to the world.

judy wu fashion designer

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What’s It Like to Work In The Fashion Industry? #BoF500

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Imagine interviewing some of the most influential people in fashion. And imagine if they were sitting in your office, for a bit. Sharing thoughts ideas, inspirations, eccentricity.

It’s now done. Fashion at Work, the new i-D film, supports the new #BoF500 rankings; on the platform, you can discover every day a new interview; we can’t wait for Alexandre de Betak one, on October 7.

Whether you like or hate Alexa Chung, Carine Roitfeld, Katie Grand, Renzo Rosso, Binx Walton etc. you can have a look at influential people.

Inspiring.

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Reductress: badass magazine for badass women

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Imagine a bunch of women who would like to change the  way “women media” are made. Fed up with diet articles, celebration of the same stars, tips to be  “perfect”? Well, you have to read Reductress, a sort of hybrid webzine; as if Reddit had met a DIY group on Pinterest (yes, we wrote that). We had a chance to ask 5 fire questions to their founders. And they rock.

 

Reductress seems pretty cheeky and pretty badass: do you already have some enemies?

We made a point of bringing enemies to the table right from the start. The mistake a lot of people make is trying make enemies along the way en route to success. The sooner you make enemies, the sooner you have the searing motivation of hate to guide you. Some of our enemies include: the patriarchy, harem pants, climate change, carbohydrates, and Josh Groban. Just kidding, we love Josh Groban and the patriarchy.

Do you consider yourself as feminist? How could we guys help feminism? 

We’re feminists with a capital ‘F,’ by which we mean we’re the pretty kind that people like. Just think of a cool woman you know who’s doing cool things for womankind and we’re basically that. Some ways that guys could help feminism would be: giving us more compliments on the street, telling us what we want, and taking care of all those boring jobs in society by being CEOs and politicians so we don’t have to be. Thanks men! XOXOXO

What was your biggest achievement so far with Reductress?

This interview is up there. Also, one time we were eating at a restaurant and Alec Baldwin sat down at the table next to us. True story. Call his agent.

Fashion can change the world: do you agree?

Yes, theoretically if someone “fashioned” a device to resolve poverty, global warming, and corporate greed, then yeah, fashion could change the world. And if you think about it, chambray shirts come pretty close to achieving all of those things. But seriously, all you have to do is look at Beyoncé or Lupita Nyong’o and it’s like, “Fashion is worn by people who are making change in the world.” And if we’re still talking about them, let’s throw Michelle Obama’s arms in there.

Last words?

Visit our website at reductress.com and click on all the advertisements while you’re there. You won’t regret it.

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In the bag of: Quy Nguyen (ELLE Vietnam)

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Meeting Quy and a bunch of other encounters in Vietnam made us want to launch this crazy project: meet all the Creatives in Vietnam under 30 and report about the Trend.

Nguyen Danh Quy is one of this rare breed nowadays in Ho Chi Minh City. Well-cultured, well-traveled, professionally ambitious and demanding, yet incredibly cool and humble. After a few years studying in Germany, he was offered a position as Deputy Managing Editor at Elle Vietnam. In a blossoming economy – still partly hit by the worldwide recession, Quy is a learner. Passionate and dedicated to researching, understanding the fashion industry, he also aspires to transmit these pioneering know-how and knowledge to students finding Fashion Marketing Bachelors barely starting to exist since 2012.

Our talks have led to a common lecture at local elite university RMIT for a class of Fashion Market, and more to come. Here are the man’s answers to a couple of questions.

–          When did you decide fashion was your way?

3 years ago when I was staying in Germany, I got an offer to be Deputy Managing Editor of Elle Vietnam magazine. My passion for fashion and luxury industry has grown very much since then, as well as my knowledge of fashion industry. There’re still so many things to learn about the industry, all the creative people, super talented designers etc. and all that keeps me staying in fashion.

–          Which brand impressed you the most and triggered your passion?

I always have the tendency for brands with minimal aesthetics and casual chic such as Jil Sander, COS, Bottega Veneta, Hermès. However, since the last three years, I have been totally in love with everything Phoebe Philo created for Céline. I think I’ve found what I truly love and the beauty I believe in. She has reinvented Cool and all of her designs, including accessories, represent what I envision cool and beautiful are.

–          How do you see the future of fashion design in Vietnam?

I see the determination and great efforts of everyone (from fashion magazine people to designers, creative directors, buyers, retailers) to make local fashion industry be more professional, more active – in general, for better. I also think fashion design in Vietnam has a bright future, if it can be more international and follow certain rules of the industry as other professional fashion industries in the world.

–          What do you bring from your experiences abroad?

Fairness, Professionalism, Open-mindedness – I try to bring different perspectives of aesthetics (Western view vs. Asian view) into my work. Additionally, when I view photographic work, I also try not to forget to look for emotions, something new that those images can evoke.

–          What would you share from Vietnam to the world of fashion to improve it?

​Our readers are very flexible and open to new ideas, ​new ways of seeing, feeling and portraying beauty. They can love a local celebrity and/or a model as much as an international ones. I think, they are all very eager to learn and experience more from the fashion world. Therefore, I hope there’d be more and more luxury brands coming to Vietnam in the time to come.
Now let’s have a peek into Quy’s quite fashionable bag. 
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